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Canada - foreign teacher

PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2016 6:50 am
by altair
I am writing this post in the name of love. Its kind of a shot in the dark. I am Portuguese, teaching in a international school in Japan and my partner is Chinese and just recently moved to Montreal for a 3 year study program, I want to move closer to him, but I am not sure how to get myself a job in an International school in Canada. I don't remember seeing Job offers from Canadian schools? Does anyone out there can give me any information about this topic? Do you know if international schools in Canada hire foreigner teachers? Any information will be helpful. Thank you!

Re: Canada - foreign teacher

PostPosted: Sat Nov 26, 2016 5:25 pm
by counselme
Hello there, Quebec doesn't have a need for international schools because there are lots of very good free English public schools for children to attend. Schools in Canada require teachers to hold a provincial licence; each province has its own teacher association. I just did a search on Search Associates to see if there is an international Canadian school listed on that site and there is not.
Kindest regards,

Response

PostPosted: Sun Dec 04, 2016 6:53 am
by PsyGuy
Nope, well not really. There are a few English IB ISs, but most of the DSs/ISs use French as the language of instruction. These would be:

Beurling Academy (Approximate AS)
Centennial Academy
Coll├Ęge Charles-Lemoyne
JPPS-Bialik High School
Lower Canada College
Marymount Academy (Approximate BS)

The following use the CAN NC:

St George's School

These are the independent/private ISs, there are others but they are CAN regulated DSs that would require a provincial credential.
You could potentially apply for one in BC, but CAN credentialing is dependent on formal academic preparation. You could apply, but there is no shortage of DTs in Quebec or Montreal, and French fluency would be a practical requirement to teach in any of the regulated DSs.

Fortunately, SA is not the Alpha and Omega in IE.

Re: Canada - foreign teacher

PostPosted: Tue Dec 06, 2016 6:32 am
by shadowjack
LOL there is no Canadian National Curriculum :-)

Either they offer the Quebec Francophone curriculum to CEGEP level, or they offer the English curriculum (often at Protestant schools) to the same level. Quebec is about the only Canadian province left that teachers to grade 13. I don't know if the "international" or private schools that might cater to foreign students offer the same (but suspect they would).

Reply

PostPosted: Sun Dec 11, 2016 8:20 am
by PsyGuy
@SJ

Yes there is, I could pick a Uni B.Ed student from any province ask them what they teach, how and why, and would get comparable responses across the provinces. St George's School uses the CEGEP and the others are IB.

I know what you mean though.

Re: Canada - foreign teacher

PostPosted: Mon Dec 12, 2016 3:14 pm
by chilagringa
That is not even remotely true.

The curriculum varies wildly from province to province.

Re: Canada - foreign teacher

PostPosted: Mon Dec 12, 2016 4:08 pm
by Overhere
PsyGuy wrote:
> @SJ
>
> Yes there is, I could pick a Uni B.Ed student from any province ask them what they
> teach, how and why, and would get comparable responses across the provinces. St
> George's School uses the CEGEP and the others are IB.
>
> I know what you mean though.

uh, no there isn't

Re: Canada - foreign teacher

PostPosted: Mon Dec 12, 2016 8:39 pm
by Helen Back
There is no Canadian national curriculum. You could pick any major western curriculum for any particular year/grade and it's going to have a lot of similarities.

Reply

PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2016 1:42 am
by PsyGuy
No the CAN NC does not change widely, its no different from the USNC or the AUS NC, CAN Uni require it. A graduate of X providence is going to have comparable foundation. Everyone argues this, because they compare the congruence to what you would experience following the UK English NC.

Re: Canada - foreign teacher

PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2016 5:19 am
by Overhere
If I say it long and hard enough it must be true, I think the president elect has been on this forum and we didn't realize it.

Reply

PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2016 5:52 am
by PsyGuy
@Overhere

As opposed to your approach of denying it long and hard enough it must not be true.

Re: Canada - foreign teacher

PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2016 8:39 am
by shadowjack
PsyGuy - how many Canadian jurisdictions have you taught in? I have taught in a few - and each is different in approach, curriculum and philosophy. You can point out similarities and say, "Yes, there is a Canadian NC". That is not true. Education is a provincial matter between kindergarten and grade 12. Federal funds and the Federal government have NOTHING to do with it, unlike the UK where the Federal state runs the education system, or the US where there is a Federal department of education.

Pointing out there are "similarities" is like saying Americans are Canadians and Canadians are Americans because there are "similarities", or that the NC curriculum of Canada is the same as the NC of the UK because they teach much of the same thing or because a UK student can apply to and be accepted by a Canadian uni. LOL

Educational philosophy isn't just what it taught - and I can assure you there is enough variation at the provincial and territorial levels to make your statement false.

Reply

PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2016 9:08 am
by PsyGuy
@SJ

Ive taught in one and am licensed in two. You are confusing education policy with curriculum. Education in Canada is provincial and while there is no national policy regulated by a central authority that is irrelevant. Unis in CAN expect and require their students to come to Uni with certain preparation, and thats ensured across CAN.
This is the same in the UN and the USNC, the US DOE does not mandate or regulate curriculum.

I can go to PEI and cellular mitosis is X, and i can than go to BC and cellular mitosis is the same, same meds/peds, same scope and sequence. That comparison is the same across a vast, vast, amount of the CAN curriculum. A BC DT can go to PEI and the classroom tasking in regards to curriculum is the same.

You are again confusing "philosophy" with "policy" the philosophy is the same the policies across provinces differ, but they all end in relatively the same place, using relatively the same pathway.

Re: Canada - foreign teacher

PostPosted: Wed Dec 14, 2016 9:11 am
by shadowjack
But if you have taught in several jurisdictions, you realize there are significant variations. It is not as cookie cutter as you assume. And, to come back to another point - I guess the NC of the UK is the national curriculum of Canada and the US because after all, mitosis is mitosis wherever it is taught :-)

Reply

PostPosted: Wed Dec 14, 2016 10:41 am
by PsyGuy
@SJ

There arent significant variations, there are variations but theres nothing significant about them that any DT/IT cant overcome. Its not a cookie cutter but its not cutting each one out by hand either.

Curriculum is more than content, but this is exactly why there is such high concurrency between DIP/A*/AP/etc.. The real issue is meds/peds and they dont differ across CAN Providences.