Stringency of undergraduate subjects

Post Reply
TCH12
Posts: 19
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2020 2:22 am

Stringency of undergraduate subjects

Post by TCH12 »

Hi All :)

As planned, I've made the move from Korea to South Africa (my homeland) to study for my PGCE. COVID has pretty much inverted the academic calendar, so I'm starting with three weeks of teaching observation (teaching practice will come later in the year), and uni lectures will commence in March. My wife and daughter are holding the fort back in Korea, and I'm missing them terribly, but hopefully the year will pass by quickly. I'll be throwing myself (and them) to the winds upon completion of the program. Whether I land an international school gig or not is up to the Gods, I suppose.

As you may (or may not) remember, my PGCE specialization will be in English Home Language, based on the fact that I studied English Literature up to third-year level (South African undergraduate degrees are typically three years). I'm just a bit worried this won't be picked up on by the average recruiter/visa official. I've checked out the staff pages of many international school websites, and, almost without fail, their English teachers are listed as having a 'BA in English Literature' followed by a PGCE of some kind.

The problem is, my undergraduate degree was quite unique in that it was a 'named' degree, specifically a BA MCC (Media, Communications & Culture). Many of my subjects focused on these disciplines, but my majors were technically (a) English Literature, and (b) Scriptwriting. Unfortunately, the fact that I studied two English Literature courses per semester for three years isn't reflected on my degree certificate. Instead, it simply states 'Baccalaureus Artium in Media, Communications & Culture'. Of course, the English Literature courses are evident on my transcript (two per semester, making for eight courses in total), but again, no where does it list English Literature as a 'major', per se.

Is this likely to be an obstacle in future, or am I being overly paranoid? (Let's not forget the fact that I'll be attempting to hit the circuit without the mandatory two years of post-qualification (PGCE) experience.)

I've uploaded a photo of my degree certificate and a scanned copy of my undergraduate transcript (English Lit courses highlighted) at the links below, just in case any recruiters/experienced teachers on this board are able to comment:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Af9Pzt ... sp=sharing
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1wF8xAJ ... sp=sharing

Big thanks, in advance! You guys rule.

TCH12
Posts: 19
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2020 2:22 am

Re: Stringency of undergraduate subjects

Post by TCH12 »

Sorry, I meant to say I completed twelve English Literature courses (not eight). Good thing I won't be teaching math.

shadowjack
Posts: 2033
Joined: Sat Oct 06, 2012 9:49 am

Re: Stringency of undergraduate subjects

Post by shadowjack »

On your CV, when you do your degree section:

BA in Media, Communications, and Culture (emphasis on English Literature)

That pulls it out and makes people look at your transcript, which as a starting teacher, you would naturally include. Later with experience, nobody will care about your transcripts.

The more important thing for schools will be your certification. That is what your regulatory authority has licensed you to teach.

TCH12
Posts: 19
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2020 2:22 am

Re: Stringency of undergraduate subjects

Post by TCH12 »

Thanks, @shadowjack! That helps a lot.

PsyGuy
Posts: 9978
Joined: Wed Oct 12, 2011 9:51 am
Location: Northern Europe

Response

Post by PsyGuy »

I disagree with @SJ. Just list it on your resume as "BA English Literature", and add your credential to teach literature. Your goal is getting pass the screeners and gate keepers, save the explanation for the interview if its necessary.

Post Reply