A question for those with kiddos...

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TCH12
Posts: 19
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2020 2:22 am

A question for those with kiddos...

Post by TCH12 »

Hi All! Profuse thanks for your ongoing support and advice. I hope to pay it forward someday, perhaps on this very board.

A quick recap of my situation:

*35 year old South African male
*Been teaching ESL in Korean public schools for the past 5 years (well, just under 5 years)
*Married to a Korean national and have a young daughter (20 months)
*About to leave my cushy Korean life (and family!) behind and return to South Africa for a year, to study my PGCE (specializing in English Home Language)
*Hoping to reunite with my wife/daughter after the year is up and weasel my way into the IS system (despite having no formal experience teaching English as a first language)

I realize the trajectory outlined above will likely land me in a less desirable school (possibly bilingual), at least for the first few years. I'm prepared to push through this, but, as a first-time parent, I'm a bit unsure what it would mean for my daughter's education. The prospect of her doing her schooling at whatever international school(s) I end up teaching at was a massive draw and pretty much the backbone of my pitch when I sold the whole idea to the wife. We agreed this would be way better than subjecting her to the joyless and merciless Korean education system.

But what if I don't manage to progress beyond bilingual schools by the time she's ready to start school? Hell, when do kids even start school these days? (said the guy wanting to be a teacher, lol) Can expat kids attend bilingual schools despite not being fluent in the local language, or is it simply unheard of?

And finally, is it a given that all kids do some form of pre-schooling/kindergarten these days? I went to a pre-school when I was young, but I distinctly remember some kids skipping this altogether. It will obviously be impossible for me to work my way into a 'decent' expat-focused school by the time she's ready for pre-school, since she's already nearly two.

Anyhoo, this is the last thing I need advice on before I dive into the deep end. Here's hoping I survive the year in crime & corona country (South Africa).

Thanks again everybody!!!

Verano
Posts: 12
Joined: Tue May 05, 2020 3:11 pm

Re: A question for those with kiddos...

Post by Verano »

I am not answering your post, and I truly apologize for this. I just thought that there might be another way for you to get into the international school system. You might have already explore this option, however, I worked with a South African colleague who did an M. Ed. Online from a university in South Africa. My other South African friend told me that her friend got a job at an international school after finishing her M.Ed.

I hope things will all work out for you.

fine dude
Posts: 583
Joined: Tue Dec 18, 2012 7:12 pm
Location: SE Asia

Re: A question for those with kiddos...

Post by fine dude »

Not all public school systems are good and not all of them offer an education in English. You need to research on the quality of the curriculum, behavioural issues, ministry of education rules etc. However, you can't go wrong if you can make it to Singapore whether it's a public school or a tier 2/3 international school. Some private bilingual schools in Thailand also offer an okay international program and are relatively inexpensive and you'd have a good shot at getting a job. Why not try your chances at international schools in Kenya or Namibia?

TCH12
Posts: 19
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2020 2:22 am

Re: A question for those with kiddos...

Post by TCH12 »

[quote=Verano post_id=60586 time=1610710419 user_id=250931]
I worked with a South African colleague who did an M. Ed. Online from a university in South Africa. My other South African friend told me that her friend got a job at an international school after finishing her M.Ed.
[/quote]
Thanks, Verano! Unfortunately my undergraduate degree is not in education, hence the PGCE. To get the M.Ed I'd have to do a PGCE anyway, followed by a B.Ed (Honours), and finally the M.Ed itself. I figured a PGCE was the most direct route to where I want to be. I think my biggest obstacle will be a lack of experience in my subject.

TCH12
Posts: 19
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2020 2:22 am

Re: A question for those with kiddos...

Post by TCH12 »

@fine dude

Thanks for the input! I'd certainly be open to teaching at a private bilingual school, provided that I'm able to teach the subject I'll be trained in (English as a first language/English Literature). No more ESL for me, haha! Also, they'd have to be willing to take my daughter on as a student.

I honestly never considered teaching in Africa (I just assumed international schools would be too few and far between), but I may just look into it!

PsyGuy
Posts: 9978
Joined: Wed Oct 12, 2011 9:51 am
Location: Northern Europe

Response

Post by PsyGuy »

K12/KS, generally starts around age 5 or 6.
You have about 3 years before your childs edu becomes an issue. That gives you time to get through your first IE appointment and in a position to be at a decent IS.
Expat/IT kids can attend a bilingual IS, its bilingual thats the point, theres a proportion thats English.
Theres a non insignificant proportion of students that dont enroll in EC.

There are a number of online M.Ed programs that dont require a UG/First degree or PGCE in edu.

Outside of Jburg or Cape Town and some ISs in Egypt,t there arent many ISs in Africa worth working at.

Heliotrope
Posts: 913
Joined: Sun May 13, 2018 1:48 am

Re: Response

Post by Heliotrope »

PsyGuy wrote:
> Outside of Jburg or Cape Town and some ISs in Egypt,t there arent many ISs
> in Africa worth working at.

The best IS in Africa is neither in South Africa nor in Egypt.
I would say both those countries have one good IS, but I guess we have different criteria.

PsyGuy
Posts: 9978
Joined: Wed Oct 12, 2011 9:51 am
Location: Northern Europe

Comment

Post by PsyGuy »

Yes it is, we disagree.

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