transferring US/QTS to Canada

PsyGuy
Posts: 9824
Joined: Wed Oct 12, 2011 9:51 am
Location: Northern Europe

Dicussion

Post by PsyGuy »

@Helen Back

So you essentially did do all the things you stated you wouldnt do and you were successful?
While that was your scenario, it very well might not require an significant time or resources for the LW, they might apply for the BC credential and get it on the first application and review with nothing more than standard wait times for processing. This is just TPF, except where everything works out for @Thames Pirate, it didnt work out for you so easily, the LW might be a Thames Pirate and not a Helen Back. They could apply and get their BC credential without having to complete any remediation, and then sail right into a great job, its not impossible. ITs do win the lottery and while your ticket wasnt a golden ticket (more like a bronze) and you paid a lot for it, the LWs might have a golden ticket they get for relatively very little. I do know you miss every shot you dont take.

Helen Back
Posts: 220
Joined: Fri Dec 28, 2012 4:16 pm

Re: transferring US/QTS to Canada

Post by Helen Back »

I also know if it was a horse no one would bet on it.

NatashaM
Posts: 22
Joined: Mon Apr 08, 2019 8:07 am

Re: transferring US/QTS to Canada

Post by NatashaM »

shadowjack wrote:
> @PG - as a BC Certified teacher with friends in multiple leadership roles through
> the system in various districts, the odds of hiring a non-landed immigrant teacher
> simply based on whether they have a BC teaching certificate when there is an oversupply
> of teachers are slim to none. I guess some people DO win the lottery, thus your
> "more than zero". As a percentage of teachers in BC, it is closer to zero than to
> 1, in percentage terms.
>
> That said, Natasha, applying for hardship posts in Northern Ontario, if you can get
> Ontario certification, or Nunavut or fly in NWT, might be easier as a way to get
> into Canada and work in education.
On the immigration website it says that teachers are needed in some provinces and BC is one of them.. Is there an oversupply of teachers in big cities or throughout the whole district? I saw some job postings for northern part of BC. Are you saying that nobody will hire me even if I qualify for express entry visa that will lead to permanent residency? Do I have more chances in Northern Ontario? I'm still at the beginning of the process so need all info I can get.. if it's even worth trying and spending a lot of money...

NatashaM
Posts: 22
Joined: Mon Apr 08, 2019 8:07 am

Re: transferring US/QTS to Canada

Post by NatashaM »

Helen Back wrote:
> Agree with Shadowjack, closer to zero than one. Probably closer to zero
> than point 1.
>
> I saw this before I closed down my Search account
> https://www.searchassociates.com/school ... or-canada/
>
> Also look at http://www.educationcanada.com &
> http://www.applytoteach.com.
>
> Having gone through the process of converting a UK 3 year degree to a
> Canadian 4 year degree and then doing my B.Ed. in BC, knowing that I'd have
> to be incredibly lucky to get even a subbing job ( fortunately I was one of
> the chosen few), I would not advise anyone to do the same, unless your plan
> is to teach overseas. And I was a permanent resident as the time.
Hi thanks for sharing the websites. I looked at Search and they need people who have lived in Canada for at least 2 years. so it's a No. In which province do you live? I already have my Bachelor in Ed and license from USA and UK so hoping that will help will getting Canadian license.

shadowjack
Posts: 1997
Joined: Sat Oct 06, 2012 9:49 am

Re: Dicussion

Post by shadowjack »

PsyGuy wrote:
> @Helen Back
>
> So you essentially did do all the things you stated you wouldnt do and you
> were successful?
> While that was your scenario, it very well might not require an significant
> time or resources for the LW, they might apply for the BC credential and
> get it on the first application and review with nothing more than standard
> wait times for processing. This is just TPF, except where everything works
> out for @Thames Pirate, it didnt work out for you so easily, the LW might
> be a Thames Pirate and not a Helen Back. They could apply and get their BC
> credential without having to complete any remediation, and then sail right
> into a great job, its not impossible. ITs do win the lottery and while your
> ticket wasnt a golden ticket (more like a bronze) and you paid a lot for
> it, the LWs might have a golden ticket they get for relatively very little.
> I do know you miss every shot you dont take.


HelenBack also said they were a landed immigrant. That's a big difference from not being a landed immigrant. LOL

shadowjack
Posts: 1997
Joined: Sat Oct 06, 2012 9:49 am

Re: transferring US/QTS to Canada

Post by shadowjack »

Natasha, the issue is that districts have to prove they could not find a Canadian to fill their post. If you are an English/History/Socials teacher, that makes it harder for you. Ditto primary. If you are a physic/chemistry teacher, that might be different.

Your best bet would be with band schools (First Nations schools in remote communities) and far northern isolated communities. This goes for any province. Ontario, which is bigger, would offer more opportunity, but there are more hoops to jump through with Ontario certification.

Helen Back
Posts: 220
Joined: Fri Dec 28, 2012 4:16 pm

Re: transferring US/QTS to Canada

Post by Helen Back »

I live in Southeast Asia. I did my B.Ed. in Vancouver knowing full well I wasnt going to get a job somewhere I actually wanted to live. Our plan was to move overseas from the start. We left the year after my wife got her B.Ed. That was a few years ago now.

NatashaM
Posts: 22
Joined: Mon Apr 08, 2019 8:07 am

Re: transferring US/QTS to Canada

Post by NatashaM »

shadowjack wrote:
> Natasha, the issue is that districts have to prove they could not find a Canadian
> to fill their post. If you are an English/History/Socials teacher, that makes it
> harder for you. Ditto primary. If you are a physic/chemistry teacher, that might
> be different.
>
> Your best bet would be with band schools (First Nations schools in remote communities)
> and far northern isolated communities. This goes for any province. Ontario, which
> is bigger, would offer more opportunity, but there are more hoops to jump through
> with Ontario certification.
I'm licensed to teach English 6-12 but my experience is in primary. I'll probably add primary to my license after I take PRAXIS.. After reading all your posts I'm really discouraged to start the process.

PsyGuy
Posts: 9824
Joined: Wed Oct 12, 2011 9:51 am
Location: Northern Europe

Discussion

Post by PsyGuy »

@Helen Back

The odds of winning the lottery are horrendous, yet lots of people still buy tickets. Long shots at the track do win.

@SJ

Big difference how? Were diverging on variance in single digit percents and the lower end of the single digits. Is it possible or impossible? My position is that its possible, with very low probability are we disagreeing? My impression is were disagreeing on word choice not the statistics?

@NatashaM

I agree with @SJ, CAN doesnt need primary or literature, humanities DTs and the challenge is going to be considerable for both you and any potential DS employer. If you were an ICT IT in Comp.S for example there are express pathways to a visa and indeed there is demand in the major cities. Otherwise your marketability improves the more hardship youre willing to endure.
CAN is an academic pathway region, neither US DOE credentials nor QTS are of any significant value. CAN wants Uni courses, credits, units of study and degrees.

shadowjack
Posts: 1997
Joined: Sat Oct 06, 2012 9:49 am

Re: transferring US/QTS to Canada

Post by shadowjack »

Natasha, as PG says, people still buy tickets to the lottery. If you don't try, you won't ever know. Go in to the process prepared to spend some $$ on having qualifcations/education evaluated, expect to take some coursework, and apply in remote rural areas. Don't hold your breath or expect anything to come of it.

That way, if nothing happens, you're not down on it. If something does happen, you can get chuffed about it. But prepare for the worst, hope for the best and it will all come out in the end! (how's that for a wet mass of platitudes? LOL)

Overseashire
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Jan 26, 2020 1:54 am

Re: transferring US/QTS to Canada

Post by Overseashire »

Many of the job openings in BC are in the north, there is a reason for that. Also many of the openings are for learning support teachers and other specialists. I taught in BC for 15 years and know teachers who have been on the sub list for a very long time.

Heliotrope
Posts: 863
Joined: Sun May 13, 2018 1:48 am

Re: Discussion

Post by Heliotrope »

PsyGuy wrote:
> The odds of winning the lottery are horrendous, yet lots of people still
> buy tickets.

I might be misinterpreting your reply (since you do say the odds are horrendous), but are you saying that just because there are people that do something that is statistically extremely unlikely to succeed, you should do it too?
There's a strong inverse correlation between people's IQ and how likely they are to play the lottery.

If there's little cost involved, I wouldn't mind playing a low odds-game. But if it required me to put in a lot of time, effort and/or money, the odds of there being a pay-off would definitely impact my decision, unless I had the time, effort and money to spare, or if it might accomplish my life-long dream and there's no alternative route.

NatashaM
Posts: 22
Joined: Mon Apr 08, 2019 8:07 am

Re: transferring US/QTS to Canada

Post by NatashaM »

Heliotrope wrote:

>
> If there's little cost involved, I wouldn't mind playing a low odds-game. But if
> it required me to put in a lot of time, effort and/or money, the odds of there being
> a pay-off would definitely impact my decision, unless I had the time, effort and
> money to spare, or if it might accomplish my life-long dream and there's no alternative
> route.
I agree! I don't like playing low-odds games. If it was just me, sure but I have two small children and no money to spare. I'm reluctant to start the process if there is no prospect of getting a job in the end.

PsyGuy
Posts: 9824
Joined: Wed Oct 12, 2011 9:51 am
Location: Northern Europe

Discussion

Post by PsyGuy »

@NatashaM

Thee is a potential prospect though of getting a job, its just a very low probability. The costs may very well be minimal (no more than application and processing costs). They could be more costly requiring coursework,etc. but you wont know until you apply and receive an evaluation report.

NatashaM
Posts: 22
Joined: Mon Apr 08, 2019 8:07 am

Re: transferring US/QTS to Canada

Post by NatashaM »

PsyGuy wrote:
> @NatashaM
>
> Thee is a potential prospect though of getting a job, its just a very low probability.
> The costs may very well be minimal (no more than application and processing costs).
> They could be more costly requiring coursework,etc. but you wont know until you
> apply and receive an evaluation report.
The cost is not minimal. It will be around 1000$ to get my degree evaluated, transcripts sent, take IELTS, collect other docs and translate them, plus application cost.

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