Search found 10793 matches

by PsyGuy
Wed Apr 24, 2024 6:34 am
Forum: Forum 1. From Questions About ISS & Search to Anything and Everything About International Teaching
Topic: Physics Teacher, No IB/A-Level Experience ‒ What Are My Options?
Replies: 10
Views: 8130

Inquiry

@d.Phys-IS

NES = Native English Speaker.

Do you have a credential? Do you have a CAPES from France or do you have registration with the Ontario College of Teachers? Some other credential (other CAN province registration, QTS, registration with one of the UK GTCs, etc.)?
by PsyGuy
Tue Apr 09, 2024 10:57 pm
Forum: Forum 1. From Questions About ISS & Search to Anything and Everything About International Teaching
Topic: COBIS
Replies: 3
Views: 4068

Response

Short Answer: Yes

Long Answer:
Sure. The term inspector is a rather generic term. COBIS inspectors (evaluators) who carry out membership inspections (evaluations) to gain COBIS membership isnt the same as a BSO inspection carried out on behalf of the Dfe. COBIS isnt any more an accreditation than COIS is, they are just a club/association that an IS can join. In that regard a COBIS inspector (evaluator) can absolutely provide both official (formal written) and unofficial (informal verbal) feedback to an ISs leadership on whatever observations they deem prudent. The IS is the client and COBIS will happily provide whatever data and report an IS wants and pays the coin for. If a COBIS inspector (evaluator) makes an unsolicited comment to leadership in whatever type of setting and context as long as its not published there isnt anything an IT can really do about it, the IS is the client not the IT. There isnt a rule or regulation that would forbid an inspector (evaluator) from relaying an observation they had. What leadership does with that and what it means for you might provide you some recourse, but people saying things about you that you dont like or agree with is just part and parcel of being in edu. You will at any time find someone who has something negative they think or say about you personally or professionally. You need to add some Teflon to your back so those types of communications slide off and to the wayside. If you dont cultivate some enemies in edu youre probably not doing anything noteworthy, though many ITs make an entire career out of doing the bobble head and being beneath notice. Now if your leader calls you to the line to account for mean girl behavior thats another story.
by PsyGuy
Tue Apr 09, 2024 10:30 pm
Forum: Forum 1. From Questions About ISS & Search to Anything and Everything About International Teaching
Topic: Moving to New Zealand to teach?
Replies: 4
Views: 5554

Discussion

Where I disagree with @SJ is the range in how those edus are represented across content fields. There arent enough edus is accurate if one of those content fields has insufficient demand, but the need isnt the same across content fields CAN/US/UK/AUS certainly do have edu shortages but not so much for primary HRTs.

If you meet the requirements the LW will get the credential but there is a cost associated with it and its not trivial. Getting a job is a whole other problem, and its not one that the LW is going to be particularly sought after.
by PsyGuy
Tue Apr 09, 2024 3:47 am
Forum: Forum 1. From Questions About ISS & Search to Anything and Everything About International Teaching
Topic: Moving to New Zealand to teach?
Replies: 4
Views: 5554

Response

Theres two questions here:

First, the process is pretty transparent, there is an English language requirement you will have to meet. Assuming (and its a big assumption) that the combination of your iPGCE and M.Ed together have a cohesive sequence of courses that meets the NZ requirements is coin flip probabilities. My reflex is youre probably over qualified in SPED/SEN/LD for general primary and youre probably short on the general and broad topics for primary. NZ requires a credential but their mutual recognition system is not credential focused (its more like the system in CAN), such that the QTS is a requirement but it alone isnt sufficient to meet the NZ credentialing requirements. The NPQSL isnt worth anything. If you do everything though and meet all the requirements, being from the LCSA isnt a barrier and in the edu scheme wont bar you from eligibility for a visa.

Second, and the question thats the real issue. Youre not what they are looking for. While you dont say where you did your bachelors/first degree or where your primary or secondary edu was from Im assuming you dont fit the look they are looking for which might be less of an impact if this was a high needs teaching field but theres no huge need for primary and your SPED/SEN/LD isnt grounded in NZ regulations, practices, etc. They are going to take a look at your photo and passport and bin it because its going to be a sizable stack of applications.

Thats really the secret, if you have a DS (or even IS) in NZ wanting to hire you, they can make it happen in terms of credentials, authorizations, permits, visas, etc. for whoever you are. There just isnt really enough desperation in NZ for your type of applicant on a big pile of primary applicants and your alternative (SPED/SEN/LD) doesnt have the NZ specific background. Hiring you means having someone hold your hand through all the production tasking for at least a year and thats just to get you to noob level. All of that is highly dependent on someone actually putting you on the short list and getting the interview time to go over it with someone in a position to hire you. Thats the hoping on one foot trying to shoot an arrow through a hoop a km away probability. Youd have to know someone who could get you an 'in' to make the probability something to set your career on.
by PsyGuy
Sun Mar 31, 2024 1:24 pm
Forum: Forum 1. From Questions About ISS & Search to Anything and Everything About International Teaching
Topic: Physics Teacher, No IB/A-Level Experience ‒ What Are My Options?
Replies: 10
Views: 8130

Inquiry

You arent a NES, are you white? What is your nationality?
by PsyGuy
Sun Mar 31, 2024 11:55 am
Forum: Forum 1. From Questions About ISS & Search to Anything and Everything About International Teaching
Topic: Family Living Locations
Replies: 6
Views: 7732

Response

You could certainly find the type of scenario you describe in a compound or in DODEA (if you lived in on base housing). As to dwellings:

1) Apartments/Flats: This is by far the most common. The type of apartments vary greatly across regions. While most ISs are in cities there are some rural ISs, and suburban ISs. Some very general commonalities are that they tend to be furnished and tend to be located near amenities such as a conbini and a fast service restaurant. If youre in a compound or housing complex these may be located within the complex. Complexes also tend to provide additional amenities such as athletic/sports courts, some exercise machines and pools. You basically find two types of apartment arrangements:

A) Provided Housing: In this scenario you get to the apartment and find everything set up for you by the IS. Often the apartment has gone through several faculty hands and the IS maintains a revolving lease agreement with the property owner. The apartment will most likely be furnished, with appropriate furniture and appliances. Usually the past ITs will have left some stuff behind which might include various countertop appliances and usually kitchen flatware and utensils (pot, pan, a cooking knife, mixing spoons, etc.). Typically, you have to procure your own linens and bedding (though this might have been left behind as well). Among the appliances there should be a clothes washer and depending on the region (uncommon in Asia) a machine dryer. Usually the last ITs will leave behind whatever cleaning products (detergent, dish soap, etc.) though amounts might vary.
As part of the housing package the IS will have turned on the utilities (power, gas, water, etc.) which may include an antenna, satellite or cable programming package (often this is the most basic programing and you have to arrange more expansive programing on your own. There may or may not be internet installed in the apartment. This may require little more than contracting with the provider and a switch being thrown somewhere, or it may require a visit by a technician. While the basics will be on you will have to arrange for the payment of these with the utility company. Typically this is something you do on your first day of new faculty orientation. For most issues like repairs you will talk to the ISs secretary or office staff who will make the appropriate calls and emails. You may even pay your utility bills with the IS or the IS may pay them directly without any input from you. Typically before your arrival a welcome basket with some basic food stuffs is provided (snacks, pasta, sauce, milk, etc.) and you may receive a settling in allowance in coin. Someone should show you how things such as the appliances and electronics work either directly or with a diagram.
This is the most convenient option but has the least flexibility. You dont have to spend a lot of time or effort but youre usually stuck with what the IS gives you.

B) Procured Housing: In this scenario you work with a leasing/property agent to identify a place and then secure leasing of it. This is usually facilitated by the IS providing a housing allowance. Your IS should put you in contact with an agent or someone to help you identify a place in advance. This kind of assistance can vary greatly. In some ISs the agent might simply be a member of the ISs office staff that knows what apartments have recently been vacated by departing staff and they simply point you towards those locations with an expectation you will accept the one option or maybe a couple of options. This is more common for first time arriving faculty who arent given provided housing. Typically the freedom to branch further out on your own only comes after spending a year or more at the IS and only if a housing allowance is provided. You will either be put in contact with the agent before your arrival and will have secured a place prior to arrival or you will spend a few days in temporary housing (hotel, etc.) and begin identifying with the leasing agent the next day. Typically you will have been in contact with them prior to arrival and they will have a few places chosen to show you on the first day.
One of the pressing issues is that ISs offer various amounts of coin and assistance in this process. The IS may provide guarantees for you saving you from some of the deposits and other fees in securing the housing unit. An IS that offers little may require the IT to commit substantial amount of coin to move in. This can easily be the equivalent of several months of rent in some locations. In addition you will have to arrange for the utilities to be billed to you and turned on. The property agent/owner may already have activated the basic utilities and only require a change in the billing information. This process can be rather time and resource intensive. An IS may bill against your housing allowance any time spent in temporary housing. They may not provide guarantees or may not provide additional coin for deposits and other startup costs. ISs will usually take a more hands off approach to procured housing as they would with provided housing. You may as a result have to report maintenance and repair issues to someone other than your IS. You will have to familiarize yourself with whatever system and process there is for a number of things from post/mail collection to security and facility fees. This option allows for greater flexibility and customization, youre more likely to get what you want in terms of priorities but its going to take more time, effort and expense.

2) Dormitory: This refers to dormitory type housing that is on the ISs campus. Typically these are rooms or small apartments in an on campus building/complex (such as an ISs Panda house in China). While the physical description may vary little between this and other apartments they do come with certain characteristics not found in other housing arrangements. Essentially, you always have to have your work face on. Your property agent/owner is the IS and thus your leadership becomes your property manager (even if its designated to a specific . or individual). You will also have your fellow staff/faculty as your neighbors. Whatever happens at the IS will follow you home. You will likely experience less separation between work life balance. Usually these properties have superior and inferior units and incoming faculty usually get the worse of them with returning staff getting priority of better units from departing staff. Suffice it to say your complaints go to leadership, and there have been times a newly arriving IT found the housing accommodations needing significant attention who had their contracts nullified and dismissed (not being a team player, or whiner).

3) Boarding: This includes various types of student housing in conjunction with some amount of faculty housing (usually as part of a house parent role). Suffice it to say in this arrangement you will never really get away from the students and their issues. Its become more common that this role is a FTE position in of itself but ITs may find themselves in a holdover situation where they are tapped to fulfill a house parent role during a holiday or break or the role may be combined with a teaching appointment.

4) Shared Housing: In this scenario the IS has procured a larger dwelling such as a house or large apartment/flat that is located off campus but typically near the IS. ITs are typically given a private room (and maybe WC/bathroom as part of an en suite) but share common areas with other ITs such as kitchen, living room, balconies/patios, clothes care facilities, etc. This option differs from the dormitory in that youre not living among the entirety of the ISs faculty but a small part of it.

5) Houses: This option has many of the same characteristics as the apartment/flat as far as mechanics. What differs is the location and availability of amenities. Typically these options are outside the CBD and urban area and usually in suburban areas. Typically you dont find the array of amenities either on the property or in the vicinity. This option is usually reserved for families that have familiar with the region and been with the IS for sometime or are settling in the region permanently. Typically the IS provides the least amount of assistance with this housing option, with the assumption you know what your doing.

6) Compounds: This is an extension of the Dormitory option with the exception that different housing sizes and amenities may be available. Instead of cookie cutter units there may be standard and premium options available where the premium options are provided at additional coin (that comes out of salary) and there are typically various sizes available. In addition both the housing unit and amenities are all controlled by the organization responsible for the compound (usually its a business interest of which the IS is just a part of).

7) Field Accommodations: This is usually associated with some form of adventure/sport/field experience. It may be a cabin on a ship, a chalet at the top/base of a ski mountain, a tent on the savanna/forest, a room in the back of a building (stable or sports complex such as an ice rink or lake), a habitat in some extreme environment (arctic, etc.), or as simple as a hotel room at a site some distance from the IS. This may be a permenant posting or a temporary one such as during an IS outing or trip. You get what the IS provides for you and its unusual to have other options.

Most ITs will get some form of housing benefit (those on an OSH package) that will include various allowances such as shipping/shopping, relocation (airfare), settling and commuting (travel between residence and the IS). Sometimes the IS provides these directly (such as in the case of a IS provided van) and other times its a reimbursement (submitted usually monthly and either received as an extra disbursement or included in your next salary disbursement) or a fixed amount (if your cost is more you pay the difference out of salary and if its less you pocket the extra).

Housing is often sited as one of the negatives of having dependent children. It cost more coin for larger accommodations to fill the same classroom. Larger accommodations may also have lower availability or command a premium in the housing market depending on cultural differences.
by PsyGuy
Wed Mar 06, 2024 10:15 pm
Forum: Forum 1. From Questions About ISS & Search to Anything and Everything About International Teaching
Topic: How important is for a Masters in Education to be accredited by an external body?
Replies: 7
Views: 7770

Reply

@lainey9

If its not a Global Ivy than a Masters is a Masters. Aside from that, how old are the programs in this specialized field? While Keele will have slightly more marketability compared to Wrexham, as youre more likely to find Keele alumni in leadership (hiring) positions, and more recognition in BSs for Keele as a Uni. Wrexham may signal an IS that you have a stronger understanding of the Welsh DE system which may be an advantage (in a very small niche). Other than that there isnt any appreciable level of status associated with Keele. Anyone who knows enough to hold their nose up to Wrexham is likely going to hold their nose up to Keele as well.
by PsyGuy
Wed Mar 06, 2024 10:06 pm
Forum: Forum 1. From Questions About ISS & Search to Anything and Everything About International Teaching
Topic: How important is for a Masters in Education to be accredited by an external body?
Replies: 7
Views: 7770

Reply

@Tol_Eressea

You would not get a T&L certificate completing the M.Ed program at UPe. The main issue is revenue and coin. These partnerships generate revenue for the IBO and UPe has very lean operating costs. You would obtain the same material benefit from the UPe M.Ed degree as you would with a T&L certificate, which is meeting the PD authorization requirement.

You can find the IBEC directory of providers here:
https://www.ibo.org/globalassets/new-st ... ory-en.pdf

That is an individual Uni requirement. The IB can establish minimum requirements but they cant prevent a Uni from having a higher requirement to read for a particular degree or study towards a degree at that Uni.

Many degrees from non-western countries are just as equally valid and respected as western degrees from the US/UK/CAN/AUS. For the most part, if a Uni isnt a Global Ivy than a Masters is a Masters. A degree from Acme State in the US or Hogwarts College in the UK worth more than some other accredited degree from elsewhere including Italy.
The issue with Italy isnt acceptability of qualifications but that a credential is limited to being placed on the register of those edu who specifically teach in the public/maintained DE system of DSs. There isnt an independent credential issued by the regulating authority.
The issue with other Unis is that often times the program is delivered in the host language and most of western IE is firmly entrenched in English which limits many programs to US/UK/CAN/AUS though there are Unis that offer advanced degrees in English (even if they are research degrees) there are Unis that offer taught advanced degrees in English.

No, the most common curriculum are NC ISs offering US or UK programs, and in the case of the Eu whatever SLL certificate and corresponding curriculum that region uses and is regulated by their MOE. The IBs programs are popular because they have to be. The IBO has to market their programs to get ISs to pay the coin for them. NC programs have a captive audience. DSs have to teach them and their development is largely (not entirely) supported by tax revenue. ISs can adapt NC curriculum rather inexpensively, while just like the IB you can buy boxes of materials, the NC standards are typically available publicly. ISs pay for inspections and accreditation and association memberships. An IS can print a diploma/certificate or other SLL document based on a NC curriculum but only the IB can provide the IB Baccalaureate, which you have to be an authorized IB IS to submit an order for.

Thats not to say the IB hasnt done a good job, they have. You find a high concentration of second tier ISs with IB programs. Which really moves the conversation to what is an IB IS. The classical definition of an IBWS was an IS IS with all three (PYP, MYP, DIP) programs for its K12/KS curriculum. That changed to be any IS that offered any of the IB programs (PYP, MYP, DIP, CRP) was an IBWS. Outside the EU you find that the DIP program is used as an ISs 'honors' track alongside an NC track. Within the EU you find that the DIP is marketed more as an 'international' track rather than an honors (or advanced, accelerated, etc. track). Within the EU you find a greater level of acceptance for the regional NC and whatever its SLL baccalaureate (certificate, etc.) than for the IB Baccalaureate.
In the UK A-levels are more valuable than the IB Baccalaureate (or IB course certificates). In the US an IB Baccalaureate is more valuable than a HS Diploma.

As to primary, there is utility in having PYP experience which usually means some level of PD training and 1-2 years of PYP experience. The PYP an its UI based thematic (transdisciplinary) approach is very alien to the stranded methodology (as well as its planning approach, etc.) often taught to DTs at Uni or in ITT/EPP programs. It takes at least a year in the classroom of growing pains before a PYP IT is competent, two years before they are proficient, a third year to before seeing expertise with portfolio, and yet another year at the advancing level to appreciate the role of exhibition in the PYP.

There are IB ISs that dont do IB very well, and youd hardly recognize anything IB related in listening to a listen (outside from the giant posters of the IB learner profile). There are not an uncommon number of IB ISs that pay little more than lip service to the IB. The IB does cost coin, and its not lite coin either. ISs need to achieve a certain level of stability and security to implement and execute a successful IB program so you see IB ISS as having that level of security and stability throughout the IS. Thats the kind of indication that says that an IS is doing enough of the right things adequately.
by PsyGuy
Wed Mar 06, 2024 9:17 pm
Forum: Forum 1. From Questions About ISS & Search to Anything and Everything About International Teaching
Topic: Accreditation requirements?
Replies: 1
Views: 5930

Response

Short Answer: Neither.

Long Answer:

I will presume you mean your inspecting body as opposed to an accrediting body.
Since the inquiry is based on the criteria of passing, neither is accurate. There are two types of inspections: compliance and achievement inspections. For compliance inspections the outcomes are only met and unmet (pass/fail) for achievement inspections the outcomes are, in rank order: inadequate, satisfactory, good, and outstanding, in which the passing standard is satisfactory. Requirements for BSOs (which is different for HMI) are that the IS must be ranked satisfactory (either met or satisfactory and above). In the most recent criteria (Summer 2023) there was a hard shift in standards criteria to meeting the regional/national rules and regulations in place for the location of the IS. If an IS is complying with the statutory rules and regulations of the host region than their inspection will rate either met or satisfactory.
Thus the issue at question is, are these Palestine ITs in compliance with the rules and regulations of the LEA? If the the LEA accepts whatever credential these ITs have than the IS would not fail an inspection on that factor.

Theres a longer answer if the extension of the inquiry is what would the criteria be to rank good or outstanding on an achievement inspection.
by PsyGuy
Wed Mar 06, 2024 8:58 pm
Forum: Forum 1. From Questions About ISS & Search to Anything and Everything About International Teaching
Topic: Arizona vs Moreland
Replies: 19
Views: 45099

Comment

Interesting, where the experience or the candidates location when applying appears to make a difference.
by PsyGuy
Wed Mar 06, 2024 8:56 pm
Forum: Forum 1. From Questions About ISS & Search to Anything and Everything About International Teaching
Topic: How realistic are my chances of an IS job?
Replies: 12
Views: 10447

Reply

@expatscot

No, it is not. Take a better look there. The A* psychology DT/IT is not teaching A* geography or A* history. I previously wrote that the LW 'MAY' be able to teach some lower secondary humanities including integrated social studies and humanities.

Its true even for third tier (floater third tier ISs at least) because humanities ITs are a pence apiece. They can get a lower secondary IT who has more recent and current experience than one whose last experience with the curriculum was nearly two decades ago.
by PsyGuy
Tue Feb 27, 2024 10:42 am
Forum: Forum 1. From Questions About ISS & Search to Anything and Everything About International Teaching
Topic: How realistic are my chances of an IS job?
Replies: 12
Views: 10447

Reply

@mittheimp

SA = Search Associates. They are a premium recruiting agency in IE. They are not an executive recruiting or head hunter agency. They dont do nearly that much work. They basically manage a database of IT dossiers and IS profiles that have vacancies. You can search for jobs and apply directly through their web portal, and occasionally, especially around fair events an IS will reach out to a candidate. In the UK public law makes it illegal to charge someone to find a job, so SA cant charge the USD$225 fee to IT candidates. SA doesnt do a lot access to the database is the focal benefit. On site, in person fairs are the secondary. Application and reference convenience are the tertiary benefits.

I disagree with @sciteach, you have the KS/K12 experience. You have two years in the UK and while they were maternity covers they were FTE and TOR appointments you also have the 6 years in SK ESOL you did at a DS and you did it under having QTS. If SA wants to accept you the experience and other requirements are there. If SA wants to reject you there is also ample reason, your age, your dated experience in KS/K12, youre very expensive and your teaching field (ESOL as well as humanities) is rather saturated.

I agree with @sciteach about the marketability of the various family dynamics. Kids are career killers. You find exceptions like you do everywhere. Where ITs make the mistake is thinking the exceptions are going to happen and benefit them and then they get frustrated when they find out they dont or the exceptions are very few and far between.

There are ISs that will be interested in western/anglo ITs kids, its becoming less common that thats a driving factor. Its easier and cheaper to hire kids with the right look from a talent agency and use those for the photos in various IE marketing, but stock photography and now with AI those images are even easier to procure and dont cost a tuition/fee waiver/place. I imagine living in SK your spouse in SK, and so your kids are likely dont have the full anglo look.

Discussing your humanities marketability and utility is a red herring, youre not a humanities IT, youre an ESOL IT, thats where the resume is. Youre humanities IT resume has much less experience on it and its a lot more dated than your ESOl resume, the ESOL resume is the strongest. There are a number of teaching areas that are saturated, and some including humanities are over saturated.

There are numerous hardship regions both outside and inside of Asia (Vietnam, Myanmar, Cambodia, etc) and would also include China and SK. The little tiger regions in Asia (JP, HK, SG, etc.) are the small group of regions not considered a hardship.
SK is a bit of an anomaly in IE, it has a small first tier, an almost empty second tier and a robust third tier. Its part of the contributing factors to why SK is part of the hardship group (though much less so than some of the regions), its very difficult to get out of the third tier while staying in SK. If you arent recruited into a first tier IS bringing an IT to SK then they tend to languish in the third tier longer or they transition out of SK.

Pursuing a local job search in SK is certainly a worthy idea. I see it having three problems though.
The first is, as I discussed in element three above, the quality of the edu and the IS. Theres about three BSs in SK youd be happy sending your kids to. Maybe two more youd be comfortable with. Less than ten total if you look outside of BSs that would be okay. Those ISs usually dont have to compromise when it comes to recruiting.
The second issue is that as an LH (Local Hire) you usually dont qualify for tuition/fee waiver/places. In an OSH package those are the bulk of the cost. The ledger value is about 12K per student and the actual value varies considerably depending on the ISs enrollment and and what age/grade level. The cost of the comp benefits in an OSH package (flights, housing, insurance, etc.) combined for a family is equal to or less than a single tuition/fee waiver/place. Thats a big ask even as an LH for an ESOL IT in a region with a lot of ESOL practitioners.
Third, youve got 11 years at a SK Uni, IE would probably amount to a haircut in coin. Without an OSH package its going to hurt a lot more.
by PsyGuy
Sun Feb 25, 2024 6:39 am
Forum: Forum 1. From Questions About ISS & Search to Anything and Everything About International Teaching
Topic: How important is for a Masters in Education to be accredited by an external body?
Replies: 7
Views: 7770

Response

Most Western Unis outside of the US are not "accredited" by an external body. In most of these regions the regulating authority is some office/department/agency in the the national government. Some programs do have an affiliation with an external organization (such as a society, etc.) but the accreditation is a government process and system. These degrees are just as valid and legitimate as those granted by the regional external accreditation organizations (WASC, etc.) in the US. In the US the US DOE maintains a list of approved accrediting organizations these can be broken down into: "regional" accrediting organizations (WASC, etc.), "national" accrediting organizations and "program" (professional) accreditation. Instead in EUR the government directly grants accreditation. In England the Ofs (Office for Students), maintains a registry of approved (and accredited) universities that you can search.

https://www.officeforstudents.org.uk/ad ... egister/#/

The IBO doesnt accredit Unis, not in the way that we think of accreditation. The IBO has a partnership with various institutions (and some non Uni organizations) where the Uni has composed a program (most leading to a degree) that then results in the student being eligible for a T&L (IBEC) certificate (with some exceptions). There is no requirement to teach in an IB IS after completing the program to obtain "accreditation". You can apply for the certificate immediately upon completion. There is a general pre-enrollment requirement of having taught for three years in an IB program for the T&L Advanced certificate, but this requirement can be met through other means and its not uncommon for those with less IB experience to enroll. Most of these programs are rather expensive (though many of them provide an online option). You may want to look at UPe (University of the People) which has a very inexpensive M.Ed program with collaboration with the IBO. It does not provide eligibility for a IBEC certificate but the main benefit is meeting the PD authorization requirements for IB ISs which is the primary benefit of the IBECs. You should be aware that outside of the IBO itself and a few classic IBWS most IB ISs and leaders dont consider the IBECs as being worth very much.

Moreland has only National US accreditation which is the weakest of the three in the US. You would have problems having your degree recognized and considering the alternatives (UPe) isnt worth the inflated cost (UPe is about USD$4K, Moreland $14K both are accredited by the same National level accrediter but Moreland doesnt have the IB advantage).

In IE the status/prestige of the Uni matters far more than external accreditation (as long as the Uni has legitimate accreditation). Doing the M.Sc in Learning and Teaching from Oxford has far more marketability than some external accrediting body. Likewise a Masters from Sunderland is going to have more utility than a degree from Moreland or UPe.

As far as interests are concerned most taught Masters programs in edu tend to be very similar. Unis have there own pet niches but this usually only varies a couple courses at most. Many of the courses you take are based on meds/peds/asst, some research and some special populations, depending on the program focus.
by PsyGuy
Thu Feb 22, 2024 11:47 pm
Forum: Forum 1. From Questions About ISS & Search to Anything and Everything About International Teaching
Topic: How realistic are my chances of an IS job?
Replies: 12
Views: 10447

Discussion

Im going to disagree with @expatscot

This is IE not DE in the UK (Scotland, England, etc.).

Being a humanities IT in a specialty does not make an IT a humanities generalist. Being able to teach poli.sci doent mean the IT can teach history or anything else for that matter.

Could the LW teach poli.sci. Maybe, if the bachelors/first degree was in poli.sci. Id be more comfortable. The citizenship syllabus from the UK NC from 2 decades ago hits a few bullet points in the current poli. sci. syllabus but there are a lot of gaps. Could they teach the IGCSE GP course, again maybe. Were talking an LW who taught a year and a half almost 2 decades ago a related course that wasnt even around at that time.

Poli.Sci is a SLL level course, its one of many and limited to only a couples grades/years. I could see an IS being able to schedule a single course/form for each year/grade but thats at best half an instructional load. Its not like history thats taught at every secondary grade/year, and its not a popular or common course. For context, in IB "Global Politics" at HL had about 4,700 candidates sit. History at HL had about 37,000 candidates sit (At SL, Global Politics had an additional 3,100 and History an additional 8,600 sit)and thats just DIP it doesnt count all the other upper and lower secondary students (MYP final year candidates had about an additional 2,600 in history and 6,300 in humanities).